Create a sound bark rather than a sound bite

When the speaker is invisible, interaction with the idea matters most. (free public domain: clipart-people.com)

(For your next phone/video call)

A listener asked me why I tend to be nice on radio. Being a friend as well, she knows that I can be annoying, quarrelsome and irritating, all at once, merely because I can.

Here’s why I stay nice on air and I hope you follow my example.

It is easy to say something inflammatory in sixty seconds. And it is even easier to do that on radio, hidden safely from view. Anyone can do that. It’s called a sound bite, with the emphasis on ‘bite’. But then what? What have I achieved?

Better to create a sound bark, a warning for you to stop and think. That’s what a dog bark achieves. It gets your attention and helps you decide on your next step.

Make what you say thought provoking, not anger inducing. Anger triggers reaction; thinking triggers interaction.

Remember, when the speaker is invisible, interaction with the idea matters most.

Welcome to my side of the nonsense divide.