How To Recognize Real Change When You See It

Insight #298

“How much longer must we wait for the Evening Star to change into the Morning Star?”

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If you look west in the evening sky immediately after the sun has set, you should see a bright point of light in the sky. Depending on your level of knowledge of the heavens, you will identify it as the evening star or as the planet Venus.

If you look east in the morning before the sun makes its appearance, you will notice a bright point of light in the sky. Again, depending on your level of knowledge of the heavens, you will identify it as the morning star or as the planet Venus.

How the planet Venus ‘changes’ from evening star to morning star depends entirely on you. What matters is your point of view: when you look and where you look.

However, if you are an astronomer, you will merely recognize the bright point of light as the planet Venus. Once you have the insight and knowledge of an astronomer, Venus no longer ‘changes’ for you from morning star to evening star and vice versa. Once you have identified it, named it and tagged it, the novelty, and the interest, of change fades.

Certain times of the year hold more magic than others. During certain weeks you should see two evening stars and two mornings stars. Again, if you are an astronomer, you will see something different. You will know in advance when the celestial orbit of the planet Mercury will align it with Venus, so that both will be visible in the same area of the heavens.

Indeed, where you look and when you look can influence what change you see. But whether you see actual change depends on the knowledge, insight, and understanding you have when you look.

Simple, isn’t it?

Welcome to my side of the nonsense divide.

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